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revised December 07, 2011
Arrow BulletAlcohol Information

If you are pregnant or planning to get pregnant, you should avoid alcohol and other drugs. Alcohol and other drugs can create problems for women trying to get pregnant, and can be harmful to your baby. No amount of alcohol is safe during pregnancy.

Drinking and Driving

Drinking and driving is a serious matter. In Canada, it is a criminal offence to drive with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .08 per cent or more. It is also illegal to drive while you are impaired, even if your BAC is less than .08 per cent.

There are strict fines and penalties for those who are caught driving while under the influence of alcohol. As of May 1st, 2009, there are new roadside suspensions for those with a BAC between .05 and .08. Specifically, the police can immediately suspend your licence up to three days for a first occurrence, seven days for a second occurrence and 30 days for a third or subsequent occurrence.

Impairment begins as soon as you start drinking. Alcohol flows through your blood and affects your thinking, judgement, perception, and reaction time. The more you drink, the greater your level of impairment and the higher your risk of death or injury. You are safest if you completely separate driving from drinking.

If you have been drinking, you can help keep yourself and others safe by using a bus, taxi, or designated driver, or by phoning friends or family members for a ride home.

News Alert : As of August 1, 2010, all drivers under the age of 21 must have a zero blood alcohol concentration level (0% BAC) when driving or they face:

  • An immediate 24-hour licence suspension
  • 30-day licence suspension
  • Up to $500 in fines

Furthermore, there will be tougher penalties for drivers in the Graduated Licensing System if they violate the conditions of their license, or if they are convicted of any Highway Traffic Act offences that carry four or more demerit points.
More information

For more information:

How to Talk to Your Children About Drugs and Alcohol

It's not always easy to discuss the topic of alcohol or drugs with your children, but it is an important conversation to have.

You may want to chat about the various drugs that are out there, or the reasons why children and youth engage in drug use. You may simply be concerned that your child is hanging out with the wrong crowd or that they may be engaging in risky behaviour.

Whatever the reason, there are several resources that the Region of Peel Public Health offers, including a parent presentation, brochures and pamphlets that will assist you with this discussion.

For helpful tips and information:

Things You Should Know When Having a Party

Where To Turn for Help

There are support services and treatment agencies in Peel that can give you more information and help you or your family deal with problems related to alcohol.

For more information:


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Revised: December 07, 2011

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