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Climate

CHANGE

Facts & Statistics

General Facts

  1. Carbon dioxide emissions have grown between 1970 and 2004 by about 80% (28% between 1990 and 2004).
  2. Source: IPCC, 2007: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2007: Mitigation. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [B. Metz, O.R. Davidson, P.R. Bosch, R. Dave, L.A. Meyer (eds)], Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA., p.3
  3. Eleven of the last 12 years (1995-2006) rank among the warmest years globally since 1850.
  4. Source: IPCC, 2007: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M. Tignor and H.L. Miller (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.) p.5
  5. The largest growth in global greenhouse gas emissions between 1970 and 2004 has come from the energy supply sector (an increase of 145%).
  6. Source: IPCC, 2007: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Chane 2007: Mitigation. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [B. Metz, O.R. Davidson, P.R. Bosch, R. Dave, L.A. Meyer (eds)], Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.) p.3
  7. Energy efficient buildings, while limiting the growth of carbon dioxide emissions, can also improve indoor and outdoor air quality, improve social welfare and enhance energy security.
  8. Source: IPCC, 207: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2007: Mitigation. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [B. Metz, O.R. Davidson, P.R. Bosch, R. Dave, L.A. Meyer (eds)], Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.) p.14

Climate Change and the Environment

  1. Southern Ontario may experience the following impacts of climate change: severe weather events, such as drought, intense rainfall, ice and windstorms, and heat waves; water shortages; lower Great lakes water levels, flooding; forest fires; reduced agricultural production; damages to infrastructure and property; power outages; and outbreaks of water-borne diseases.
  2. Source: Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007 (18.78MB, 453 pages). Government of Canada, p.229
  3. Southern Ontario experiences warmer temperatures and higher humidity, relative to other regions of the province, due to many factors, including urban heat-island effects that can produce temperatures as much as 3oC warmer than in surrounding rural areas.
  4. Source: Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007 (18.78MB, 453 pages). Government of Canada, p. 252
  5. Scientists estimate that one million species, or a quarter of the world's land-based plants and animals will be at risk of extinction by 2050 in response to shifting habitats due to climate change.
  6. Source: David Suzuki Foundation

How Climate Change Affects People's Health

  1. Projected climate change-related exposures are likely to affect the health status of millions of people by creating favourable climates for vector- and rodent-borne diseases like Lyme disease, illnesses contracted from ticks, mosquitoes and West Nile virus, and conditions related to UV exposure like cataracts, melanomas, and sunburn.
  2. Source: Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007 (18.78MB, 453 pages). Government of Canada, p.249, 250; IPCC, 2007: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, M.L. Parry, O.F. Canziani, J.P. Palutikof, P.J. van der Linden and C.E. Hanson, Eds., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 7-22.) p.11, 12
  3. The year 1998 was not just the hottest year in a millennium, but was also the first in which more people fled disaster than war, according to the International Red Cross. These 25 million environmental refugees "represented 58% of the total refugee population worldwide."
  4. Source: WWF's People at Risk
  5. Elderly people are at high risk of illness and premature death from climate-related events like heat waves and increased smog levels. Heat-related mortality could more than double in southern and central Ontario by the 2050s, while air pollution mortality could increase about 15 to 25% during the same time.
  6. Source: Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007 (18.78MB, 453 pages). Government of Canada, p.226.
  7. Southern Ontario is expected to experience an increase in occurrence of smog advisory days. In 2005, Ontario recorded 53 smog advisory days, exceeding the previous record of 27 smog advisory days in 2002.
  8. Source: TRCL's Climate Change - Climate Science - Trends and Forecasts (49KB, 3 pages), p.2
  9. In the summer of 2003, Europe experienced summer temperatures that were unprecedented on instrumental record. This heat wave claimed the lives of an estimated 20,000 people.
  10. Source: David Suzuki Foundation

The Cost of Climate Change

  1. The Great Lakes recreational boating and fishing industry is negatively impacted by extremely low water levels.
  2. Source: Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007 (18.78MB, 453 pages). Government of Canada, p.255
  3. The 1998 ice storm affected eastern Ontario, southwestern Quebec, southern New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, and portions of the northeastern United States. These areas received 80 mm or more of freezing rain, double the amount received in any previous ice storm. In Canada, this event cost more than $5.4 billion and left 250,000 people in Ontario without power, some for up to 24 days.
  4. Source: Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007 (18.78MB, 453 pages). Government of Canada, p.236
  5. In recent years, flooding associated with severe weather has disrupted transportation and communication lines, with damage costs exceeding $500 million.
  6. Source: Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007 (18.78MB, 453 pages). Government of Canada, p.229
  7. An intense storm system moving across southwestern Ontario on Aug. 19, 2005, caused extensive flooding and infrastructure damage, and more than $500 million in insured losses. The storm resulted in the collapse of a section of Finch Avenue in York Region, which resulted in damaged to two high-pressure gas mains, a potable water main, and telephone, hydro and cable service lines.
  8. Source: Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007 (18.78MB, 453 pages). Government of Canada, p.251
  9. Climate change is expected to produce conditions that favour agricultural pests and diseases, which could negatively impact crop production.
  10. Source: Impacts to Adaptation: Canada in a Changing Climate 2007 (18.78MB, 453 pages). Government of Canada, p.250
  11. In 2004, the global insurance industry claimed $44 billion in insured losses due to extreme weather events such as floods and hurricanes.
  12. Source: David Suzuki Foundation

How You Can Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

  1. According to Energy Star, if every home in America replaced just one incandescent light bulb with a compact fluorescent light bulb, it would save enough energy to light more than 3 million homes and prevent greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to running more than 800,000 cars annually.
  2. Source: MySchoolLights.com
  3. Compact fluorescent lights save up to 70% of the energy used by traditional incandescent lights. Roughly 95% of the energy used by incandescent lights is given off as heat rather than light. Compact fluorescent light bulbs roughly triple energy efficiency.
  4. Source: MySchoolLights.com
  5. Lighting represents as much as 25% of the electricity you use at home. Switching all incandescent lights to compact fluorescent bulbs would save the average household roughly US $300 annually.
  6. Source: MySchoolLights.com
  7. Lifestyle changes that favour resource conservation can reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  8. Source: IPCC, 2007: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2007: Mitigation. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [B. Metz, O.R. Davidson, P.R. Bosch, R. Dave, L.A. Meyer (eds)], Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.) p. 12
  9. Decisions we make about what we eat can have an impact on the climate. There are several factors that contribute to food's climate impact, including: how much meat is consumed, whether food is grown organically or with chemical inputs, and how far the food has to travel before it gets to you.
  10. Source: David Suzuki Foundation
  11. To reduce greenhouse gases, drive a fuel efficient car, reduce your driving speed; tune up and maintain your car, save carpool; combine errands or ride your bike instead of driving, and pump up your tires.
  12. Source: Calgary.FoundLocally.com
  13. Support local farmers by shopping at farmers' markets. You will not only be reducing your "food miles," but will be helping the local economy and getting the freshest food possible.
  14. Source: David Suzuki Foundation
  15. Composting and recycling will reduce waste, save landfill space and avoid greenhouse gas emissions. Buying recycled or used goods saves the energy required to manufacture, package and ship a new product. You can replace old, inefficient appliances with high-efficiency units.
  16. Source: David Suzuki Foundation (99.58 KB, 2 pages).


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