Peel Region homepage
main

Getting your child immunized

Where and when to get your child immunized to protect against diseases like measles, tetanus, whooping cough and chicken pox.

Remember, every time your child gets immunized you need to report it to the Region. To learn how, see our report your child’s immunizations page.

Where to get your child immunized

You can get your child immunized by visiting your doctor, a walk-in clinic, or by contacting us.

Take your child's yellow immunization card with you when you visit. If you don't have a yellow card, your doctor can give you one.

If you do not know if your child received a specific immunization, you can:

When to get your child immunized

Children receive specific immunizations at different ages.

By law, children who attend primary or secondary school in Ontario must be immunized against certain diseases.

Several vaccines can be given at the same time. If you have any questions, speak with your family doctor or health care provider.

2 months

Swipe to show more of table

Vaccines to be given at 2 months

Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, and Haemophilus Influenzae B

Combined vaccine that protects against 5 diseases:

  • Tetanus (lockjaw) – a disease that affects nerves that control muscles
  • Diphtheria – a disease of the nose, throat, and skin
  • Pertussis – a disease that causes prolonged coughing
  • Polio – a disease that can cause nerve damage and paralysis
  • Haemophilus Influenzae type b – a disease that can cause bacterial meningitis and infection in the throat, lungs, bones, and joints

Pneumococcal–Conjugate–13

Combined vaccine that protects against certain infections such as:

  • Pneumonia – an infection of the lungs
  • Bacteraemia – an infection of the blood
  • Meningitis – an infection of the brain

Rotavirus

Protects infants against diarrhea and vomiting caused by a rotavirus infection.

4 months

Swipe to show more of table

Vaccines to be given at 4 months

Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, and Haemophilus Influenzae B

Combined vaccine that protects against 5 diseases:

  • Tetanus (lockjaw) – a disease that affects nerves that control muscles
  • Diphtheria – a disease of the nose, throat, and skin
  • Pertussis – a disease that causes prolonged coughing
  • Polio – a disease that can cause nerve damage and paralysis
  • Haemophilus Influenzae type b – a disease that can cause bacterial meningitis and infection in the throat, lungs, bones, and joints

Pneumococcal–Conjugate–13

Combined vaccine that protects against certain infections such as:

  • Pneumonia – an infection of the lungs
  • Bacteraemia – an infection of the blood
  • Meningitis – an infection of the brain

Rotavirus

Protects infants against diarrhea and vomiting caused by a rotavirus infection.

6 months

Swipe to show more of table

Vaccines to be given at 6 months

Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, and Haemophilus Influenzae B

Combined vaccine that protects against 5 diseases:

  • Tetanus (lockjaw) – a disease that affects nerves that control muscles
  • Diphtheria – a disease of the nose, throat, and skin
  • Pertussis – a disease that causes prolonged coughing
  • Polio – a disease that can cause nerve damage and paralysis
  • Haemophilus Influenzae type b – a disease that can cause bacterial meningitis and infection in the throat, lungs, bones, and joints

Rotavirus

Protects infants against diarrhea and vomiting caused by a rotavirus infection.

12 months

Swipe to show more of table

Vaccines to be given at 12 months

Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR)

  • Combined vaccine that protects against 3 diseases:
    • Measles – a disease that causes fever, a sore throat, and skin rash
    • Mumps – a disease that causes the salivary glands to swell
    • Rubella – a disease that causes fever, inflamed red eyes, and skin rash
  • Must be given on or after the first birthday
  • 2 doses required – second dose is usually given with Varicella (chicken pox) at 4 to 6 years of age

Pneumococcal–Conjugate–13

Combined vaccine that protects against certain infections such as:

  • Pneumonia – an infection of the lungs
  • Bacteraemia – an infection of the blood
  • Meningitis – an infection of the brain

Meningococcal–Conjugate–C

  • Protects against meningococcal disease, a serious illness that can cause an infection of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis) or an infection of the blood (meningococcemia)
  • Must be given on or after the first birthday

15 months

Swipe to show more of table

Vaccines to be given at 15 months

Varicella

  • Protects against Varicella (chickenpox), an infection that causes an itchy rash with small, fluid–filled blisters
  • 2 doses required – second dose is usually given with MMR at 4 to 6 years of age

18 months

Swipe to show more of table

Vaccines to be given at 18 months

Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis and Polio

Combined vaccine that protects against 4 diseases:

  • Tetanus (lockjaw) – a disease that affects nerves that control muscles
  • Diphtheria – a disease of the nose, throat, and skin
  • Pertussis – a disease that causes prolonged coughing
  • Polio – a disease that can cause nerve damage and paralysis

4–6 years

Swipe to show more of table

Vaccines to be given at 4 – 6 years

Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, and Polio

Combined vaccine that protects against 4 diseases:

  • Tetanus (lockjaw) – a disease that affects nerves that control muscles
  • Diphtheria – a disease of the nose, throat, and skin
  • Pertussis – a disease that causes prolonged coughing
  • Polio – a disease that can cause nerve damage and paralysis

Measles/Mumps/Rubella/Varicella (MMRV)

  • Combined vaccine that protects against 4 diseases:
    • Measles – a disease that causes fever, a sore throat, and skin rash
    • Mumps – a disease that causes the salivary glands to swell
    • Rubella – a disease that causes fever, inflamed red eyes, and skin rash
    • Varicella (chickenpox) – an infection that causes an itchy rash with small, fluid–filled blisters
  • Must be given on or after the first birthday
  • 2 doses required – first dose of MMR is usually given at 12 months of age and first dose of Varicella (chicken pox) is usually given at 15 months of age

Grade 7

Public Health nurses provide these vaccines at school–based immunization clinics for students in Grade 7. These vaccines require parental consent. Learn more about the Grade 7 clinic and vaccine schedule.

Swipe to show more of table

Vaccines to be given in Grade 7

Meningococcal–Conjugate–ACYW–135

  • Protects against meningococcal disease, a serious illness that can cause an infection of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis) or an infection of the blood (meningococcemia)
  • One injection only

Hepatitis B

  • Protects against Hepatitis B, a disease that affects the liver and can cause permanent damage
  • Given in a series of two injections, 4-6 months apart

HPV

  • Protects against the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), a disease that can cause genital warts and lead to certain cancers
  • Given in a series of two injections, 6 months apart

14 to 16 years

To avoid suspension from school, your child must be given the Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis (Tdap) vaccine 10 years from the date of their last dose.

For example, if your child was given a vaccine that contained Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis at 4 years old, a dose of Tdap vaccine should be given at 14 years old.

Swipe to show more of table

Vaccines to be given at 14 to 16 years

Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis

Combined vaccine that protects against 3 diseases:

  • Tetanus (lockjaw) – a disease that affects nerves that control muscles
  • Diphtheria – a disease of the nose, throat, and skin
  • Pertussis – a disease that causes prolonged coughing